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February 2022

 

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  NSF Extends Lifespan of TACC's Stampede2 Supercomputer Through June 2023

Stampede2 (pictured above) provides HPC capabilities to thousands of researchers across the United States. Credit: TACC.

 
 

NSF Extends Lifespan of TACC's Stampede2 Supercomputer Through June 2023

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has extended operational funding for the Stampede2 supercomputer through June 2023, which will allow the system to continue to support world-class science for an additional nine months. Stampede2 was the most powerful, capable academic supercomputer in the world when it entered full production in 2017. Since then, the system has powered nearly 10 million jobs and enabled unprecedented science and engineering research.

 
     
 
 
  Computing Carbon Storage

Sahar Bahkshian, Research Associate at the Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences, UT Austin.

 

Computing Carbon Storage

Carbon capture and storage refers to the process of injecting CO2 from industrial sources into deep geological reservoirs underground. Sahar Bakhshian of UT Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology uses TACC supercomputers to understand how CO2 storage works at the level of micrometer-wide pores in rock.

 
 
     
 
 
  Solving a Superconducting Mystery with More Precise Computations

Crystallographic structure of a cuprate Yttrium barium copper oxide, a high temperature superconductor. Credit: Julien Bobroff, LPS, Orsay, France

 

Solving a Superconducting Mystery with More Precise Computations

A new, more precise method of simulating quantum materials has revealed the basis for superconductivity in copper-based oxides known as cuprates. Using Frontera, researchers found that phonons — vibrational energy from crystal structures — contribute to a key feature observed in cuprates, which may indicate they can be tuned to induce superconductivity.

 
 
     
 
 
  An AI Assistant for Material Discovery

JARVIS (Joint Automated Repository for Various Integrated Simulations) is an open dataset designed to automate materials discovery and optimization. Credit: NIST

 

An AI Assistant for Material Discovery

Using TACC's Frontera, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology developed a database of atomic properties for 70,000 materials. These were used to train a neural network that outperforms previous models on atomistic prediction tasks. The researchers used the network to predict the properties of porous materials that can remove CO2 from the atmosphere.

 
 
     
 
 
  TACC Helps Billie L. Turner Plant Resources Center Reach Outstanding Milestone

Salvia jorgehintoniana, a kind of Mexican sage, was described as new to science in 1995 by former Plant Resources Center director and its namesake, the late Dr. Billie L. Turner.

 

TACC Helps Billie L. Turner Plant Resources Center Reach Outstanding Milestone

With the help of veteran TACC staffer Tomislav Urban and NSF funding, the UT Austin Billie L. Turner Plant Resources Center has cataloged more than 500,000 botanical specimens, including 250,000 images, to TACC systems Corral and Roundup. The plant specimens provide a mechanism by which species characteristics and their place in space and time can be preserved for current and future study.

 
 
     
 
 
  Into the Vortex

Into the Vortex

TACC's supercomputers are helping Texas Tech scientists peer deeper into the mysterious characteristics of vortices and turbulence. Their simulations support the hypothesis that vortex reconnection is the essence behind most turbulence cascade, fluid mixing, and aerodynamic noise generation. Their research could help improve fuel efficiency for cars and help develop energy-saving aircraft designs.

  UT Austin #1 in NSF Funding in United States

UT Austin #1 in NSF Funding in United States

According to the annual Higher Education Research and Development (HERD) Survey, UT Austin ranks No. 1 among U.S. universities in research financed by the National Science Foundation (NSF) in fiscal year 2020. The university had NSF research expenditures totaling more than $144 million. The NSF award for TACC's Frontera supercomputer was cited as one of the reasons contributing to this ranking.

  Work at TACC!

Work@TACC

Working at TACC means being part of a dynamic and exciting environment, where talented individuals pursue their interests, engage their imaginations, and work at the forefront of computational research. Working with us also means living in Austin, an exceptional city that thrives on innovation, culture, and creativity.

 
 
     
 
 
 

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