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September 2021

 

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  Celebrate (Virtually) With Us!  
 

Celebrate (Virtually) With Us!

September 30, 2021 | 4:15pm-4:45pm CST

On June 1, 2001, the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) began its journey to becoming one of the leading academic supercomputing centers in the world. We invite you to join us virtually for remarks from our special guests, including President Hartzell and Michael Dell, as we celebrate this special occasion. We look forward to seeing you there!

Visit our 20th Anniversary web page for Zoom details: www.tacc.utexas.edu/TACC20.

 
     
 
 
  Simulation Reveals How a SARS-CoV-2 ‘Gate' Opens to Allow COVID-19 Infection

Supercomputing Supercomputing-driven simulations depict the glycan N343 (magenta) acting as a molecular crowbar to pry open the SARS-CoV-2 spike's receptor binding domain, or RBD (cyan), from a ‘down' to an ‘up' position. Credit: Amaro Lab, UC San Diego.

 

Supercomputing Simulation Reveals How a SARS-CoV-2 ‘Gate' Opens to Allow COVID-19 Infection

The Amaro Lab at UC San Diego used simulations on TACC's Longhorn and SDSC's Comet supercomputers to discover how glycans— molecules that make up a sugary residue around the edges of the spike protein — act as "gates" that open to allow SARS-CoV-2 entry into human cells. Gating behavior provides a rich target for further research that could lead to new COVID-19 treatments.

 
 
     
 
 
  TACC Key Partner in NSF-Funded ICICLE Institute to Expand AI Research

The NSF announced a $220 million investment in 11 new AI research institutes building on the first round of seven AI institutes funded last year. See the full interactive map here. Credit: NSF.

 

TACC Key Partner in NSF-Funded ICICLE Institute to Expand AI Research

The Ohio State University, TACC, and other partners will help make AI data and infrastructure more accessible to society at large as part of the new NSF-funded ICICLE institute. Many of the prototypes and capabilities developed by the institute will be integrated into TACC's Tapis framework.

 
 
     
 
 
  Protecting Earth from Space Storms

A space weather modeling framework simulation of the 09.10.14 coronal mass ejection during solar maximum. Credit: Gabor Toth, University of Michigan.

 

Protecting Earth from Space Storms

Solar activity can disrupt power grids and satellite communications. Researchers from the University of Michigan are using TACC's Frontera supercomputer to develop new geomagnetic forecasting methods and updating the Geospace Model used by NOAA. They aim to improve lead time for space weather events from 30 minutes to one to three days.

 
 
     
 
 
  Powering the Next Advanced Materials Revolution

Feliciano Giustino, Oden Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, UT Austin.

 

Powering the Next Advanced Materials Revolution

A new National Science Foundation-funded project led by Feliciano Giustino of the Oden Institute and Dan Stanzione of TACC will provide a major boost for advanced materials research. The project will create a software ecosystem to model and design materials at the atomic scale for applications in electronics, lighting, energy, and quantum technology.

 
 
     
 
 
  Adapting Roots to A Hotter Planet Could Ease Pressure on Food Supply

A digital twin of a field-grown maize root created using DIRT/3D. Credit: Alexander Buck, University of Georgia.

 

Adapting Roots to A Hotter Planet Could Ease Pressure on Food Supply

Our ability to grow enough food to support the population despite a changing climate, and to fix carbon in the soil, are critical to our survival. A new 3D root phenotyping platform uses TACC's Stampede2 system to analyze plant roots — a first step to creating crops that can withstand higher temperatures and sequester more CO2 in the soil.

 
 
     
 
 
  2021 TACC Symposium for Texas Researchers — Just Around the Corner!

2021 TACC Symposium for Texas Researchers — Just Around the Corner!

The TACCSTER annual conference (Sept. 23-24) is a meeting of scientists, engineers, scholars, and students from across the state of Texas who use, and would like to use, TACC to advance their research goals. The event is virtual (and free), but registration closes Sept. 17. Hope to see you there!

  Q&A with Carlos Cardenas, Clinical Medical Physicist at the University of Alabama, Birmingham

Q&A with Carlos Cardenas, Clinical Medical Physicist at the University of Alabama, Birmingham

“I am very fortunate to have had HPC resources available through my training, as I am confident they have had a positive impact on my development towards becoming an independent scientist.”
– Carlos Cardenas

  Work at TACC!

Work@TACC

Working at TACC means being part of a dynamic and exciting environment, where talented individuals pursue their interests, engage their imaginations, and work at the forefront of computational research. Working with us also means living in Austin, an exceptional city that thrives on innovation, culture, and creativity.

 
 
     
 
 
 

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