February 2021

 

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  Evolving the Early Universe in 24 Hours

A 50 Mpc/h square box centered on the largest galactic halo showing in turn the dark matter, temperature, metallicity, and neutral hydrogen fraction, and including a zoomed-in image of the host galaxy. Credit: Yueying Ni, Carnegie Mellon University.

 
 

Evolving the Early Universe in 24 Hours

A team of researchers simulated the early history of the Universe at unprecedented resolution using TACC's Frontera supercomputer. The simulation — which ran on the full system for 24 hours — was the largest cosmological simulation ever performed at this resolution. It peaked at more than 400,000 processors in a single job and included almost 400 billion elements.

A day in the life of Frontera

 
     
 
 
  New Funding to Support Leadership-Class Application Partners

Planning is underway for the NSF's Leadership Class Computing Facility. Credit: Jorge Salazar, TACC.

 

New Funding to Support Leadership-Class Application Partners

The National Science Foundation issued a ‘Dear Colleague' letter inviting research teams to become science and engineering application partners with the Leadership-Class Computing Facility during the planning and construction stages of the project. NSF will award up to $150,000 per year to research teams to work with TACC to improve codes and help drive requirements for future HPC systems.

Optimizing codes for next-gen HPC

 
 
     
 
 
  Computational Medicine – Moving from Uncertainty to Precision  

Computational Medicine – Moving from Uncertainty to Precision

Is computational medicine on the verge of revolutionizing the future of healthcare? Experts from the Dell Medical School, Oden Institute, and TACC discuss the value of using complex computing modeling to impact maternal and fetal health and other areas of medicine in the January edition of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

State-of-the-art computation in medical care

 
 
     
 
 
  Simulating 800,000 Years of California Earthquake History to Pinpoint Risks

(Left to right) Kevin Milner, SCEC, University of Southern California and Bruce Shaw, Columbia University.

 

Simulating 800,000 Years of California Earthquake History to Pinpoint Risks

A new study led by Kevin Milner (Southern California Earthquake Center) and Bruce Shaw (Columbia University) presents results from a prototype earthquake simulator that recreates hundreds of thousands of years of seismic history in California. This new approach improves the ability to pinpoint how big an earthquake might occur at a given location, allowing for more resilient buildings.

Determining seismic risk

 
 
     
 
 
 
How to Train a Robot

Examples of 3D point clouds synthesized by the progressive conditional generative adversarial (PCGAN) for an assortment of object classes. Credit: William Beksi, Mohammad Samiul Arshad, UT Arlington.

 

How to Train a Robot

Computer scientists from UT Arlington developed a deep learning method to create realistic objects for virtual environments that can be used to train robots. The researchers used TACC's Maverick2 supercomputer to train the first generative adversarial network that can produce colored point clouds with fine details at multiple resolutions.

Advancing robotic perception

 
 
     
 
 
  Cell Bones Mystery Solved with Supercomputers

Cell Bones Mystery Solved with Supercomputers

With the help of TACC's Stampede2 supercomputer, researchers solved the mystery of how actin filaments – thin, flexible protein strands – chain together. This fundamental research could be applied to treatments that stop the spread of cancer, develop self-healing materials, and more.

Solving a decades-old mystery (listen to the podcast, too!)

  Frontera Fellows 2020-2021: Maureen Kitheka and Jeane Camelo

Frontera Fellows 2020-2021: Maureen Kitheka and Jeane Camelo

Halfway through TACC's 2020-2021 inaugural Frontera Fellowship, TACC caught up with two of the awardees to talk about their experiences thus far.

Watch video

  Work at TACC!

Work@TACC

Working at TACC means being part of a dynamic and exciting environment, where talented individuals pursue their interests, engage their imaginations, and work at the forefront of computational research. Working with us also means living in Austin, an exceptional city that thrives on innovation, culture, and creativity.

Work at the forefront of computational research

 
 
     
 
 
 

 

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