September 2019

 

About TACC   |   Contact

 
 
  TACC Boosts U.S. Science with Largest Academic Supercomputer in the World

Fronter Supercomputer Dedication: (left to right) Tommy Minyard (TACC), Jim Kurose (NSF), Manish Parashar (NSF), Greg Fenves (UT Austin), Fleming Crim (NSF), and Dan Stanzione (TACC)

 
 

TACC Boosts U.S. Science with Largest Academic Supercomputer in the World

This week, TACC launched Frontera, the fastest supercomputer at any university and the 5th most powerful system in the world. Joined by representatives from the National Science Foundation, which funded the system with a $60 million award, and the center's technology partners, TACC and UT Austin inaugurated a new era of academic supercomputing with a resource that will help the nation's top scientists explore science at the largest scale and make the next generation of discoveries.

READ MORE

 
 
     
 
 
  DIY: How to Build a Supercomputer  

DIY: How to Build a Supercomputer

The construction of the Frontera supercomputer involved collaborations with multiple industry partners over the course of several months. Dell EMC delivered fully integrated racks. Mellanox provided the HDR InfiniBand network. Intel provided its 8280 Cascade Lake processors. DataDirect Networks supplied the storage appliances. Green Revolution Cooling, Cooltera, and CoolIT supplied an innovative liquid cooling systems. See a photo gallery of Frontera taking shape.

The Build

 
 
     
 
 
  Raising the Standard for Psychology Research

Psychological graph of all dependent variables (DVs).

 

Raising the Standard for Psychology Research

Researchers from Stanford University, Arizona State University, and Dartmouth College used TACC supercomputers to apply rigorous statistical methods to psychological studies of self-regulation. The work uncovered underlying structures of the mind, a process they call "data-driven ontology discovery." The research was published in Nature Communications.

Uncover the structures of the mind

 
 
     
 
 
 
Turbulence Meets a Shock

A new theoretical framework was developed and tested using TACC's Stampede2 supercomputer. Credit: Chang-Hsin, Texas A&M University

 

Turbulence Meets a Shock

Researchers from Texas A&M developed a new theoretical framework with a focus on high intensity turbulence to better understand thermodynamic quantities, shock structure, and amplification factors. Using TACC's Stampede2, they ran simulations of shock turbulence interactions at unprecedented levels of realism. Their research could help develop supersonic and hypersonic aircraft, and develop more efficient engine ignition.

Get Shocked

 
 
     
 
 
 
TACC's Research Experience for Teachers

Jessica Marquez (left) and Katrina Van_Houten (right) from Del Valle High School.

 

TACC's Research Experience for Teachers

For the past two months, Jessica Marquez (left) and Katrina Van Houten (right), both math teachers at Del Valle High School, have called TACC home during the Research Experience for Teachers (RET). The project recruits high school teachers to work alongside faculty, researchers, and TACC staff who guide them to develop classroom experiences and teach computer science-based lessons that connect current research in natural hazards engineering to grades K-12.

 
 
     
 
 
  Annual TACCSTER Meeting 2019  

Annual TACCSTER Meeting 2019

Registration is closing soon for the TACC Symposium for Texas Researchers (TACCSTER) meeting this September 26-27. Participate in discussions, learn new skills, and network with other Texas-based computational researchers.

Register Today

 
 
     
 
 
  Welcome Ethan Ho to TACC

Welcome Ethan Ho to TACC!

Ethan Ho has joined the Life Sciences group at TACC as a Collaborative Science Specialist. His research experience includes computational, structural, and biochemical characterization of enzymes. At TACC, he'll promote accessible, reproducible use of advanced computing resources in collaboration with life science researchers.

  TACC Wants to Hear from You!

TACC Wants to Hear from You!

TACC supports researchers, educators, and students across the country. What has TACC helped you achieve? TACC would love to hear about your successes so we can highlight your work in reports, publications, and on social media.

Send your story ideas: communications@tacc.utexas.edu

  Work at TACC!

Work @ TACC

Working at TACC means being part of a dynamic and exciting environment, where talented individuals pursue their interests, engage their imaginations, and work at the forefront of computational research. Working with us also means living in Austin, an exceptional city that thrives on innovation, culture, and creativity.

EXPLORE OPPORTUNITIES

 
 
     
 
 
 

 

Contact | Feedback | Jobs

©2011-2017 Texas Advanced Computing Center
10100 Burnet Road, Austin, TX 78758
The University of Texas at Austin

Unsubscribe