May 2019

 

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  TACC Contributes to GRACE Mission's Understanding of Climate Change

GRACE satellites provide data about monthly surface mass changes to analyze Earth's water, ice, and land.

 
 

TACC Contributes to GRACE Mission's Understanding of Climate Change

For more than 15 years, the GRACE mission has measured changes in the Earth's gravitational fields and provided unprecedented insights into global water resources from more accurate measurements of polar ice loss to a better view of ocean currents, enabled by TACC resources. "As the demand for the GRACE science deliverables have grown, TACC's ability to support these demands have grown. It has been a seamless transition from the initial requirements supporting a demonstration of the concept to a much more demanding computational regime, supporting a much richer suite of scientific results," says Byron Tapley, who established the Center for Space Research at UT in 1981 and serves as principal investigator of the GRACE mission.

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  Pulsating Cells

Electroporation is used in the treatment of some cancers and to accelerate wound healing. Researchers used TACC supercomputers to model this phenomenon.

 

Pulsating Cells

The application of an electric field can alter a cell membrane's permeability to chemicals in their vicinity or even kill the subjected cells, a process known as electroporation. In new research published in the Journal of Computational Physics, researchers proposed a new computational framework for parallel simulations that models the complex bioelectrical interaction at the tissue scale. Using TACC supercomputers, the researchers studied the bioelectric effects of cells to develop new anti-cancer strategies.

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  Transforming Waste Heat into Clean Energy

New nanomaterials may be able to turn waste heat into useable electricity for vehicles and other systems.

 

Transforming Waste Heat into Clean Energy

Researchers from UT Permian Basin used TACC's Lonestar5 supercomputer to identify new materials that can convert heat into energy, a process known as thermoelectric generation. The researchers hope to engineer a paste that could be applied to the tailpipe of a vehicle, converting waste heat into electricity to power a car's electrical systems. Such a device could cost less than $500 per vehicle and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by hundreds of millions of tons annually.

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How Much

Aerospace engineer and space environmentalist Moriba Jah. Credit: Moriba Jah / CC BY-SA 4.0

 

How Much "Space Junk" Is In The Earth's Orbit?

Moriba Jah, an aerospace engineering professor at UT Austin and self-described "space environmentalist," studies the old satellites and other debris floating in orbit, also known as space junk. Jah developed Astriagraph, a software program that tracks the approximate positions and speeds of more than 20,000 objects in Earth's orbit. He uses TACC resources to track and predict the behavior of these objects using orbital models.

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  TACC, SDSC Supercomputer Simulations Help Combat Tuberculosis Granulomas

Stampede2 and Comet enabled researchers to use the GranSim software to simulate a 3D tuberculosis granuloma in the lung. Credit: Denise Kirschner, University of Michigan Computation Turberculosis Lab

 

TACC, SDSC Supercomputer Simulations Help Combat Tuberculosis Granulomas

Tuberculosis is one of the leading causes of death by infectious disease. Researchers are using supercomputers from TACC and the San Diego Supercomputer Center to combat this lethal disease by using highly detailed computer-based simulations to determine ways to treat the disease before the bacteria harbored within them spread to surrounding tissue and organs.

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  Science on Repeat Podcast  

“Science on Repeat” Podcast

Reproducibility is at the heart of the scientific method. This goes for the computational analysis of data, as well as lab experiments. TACC enhances reproducibility by developing custom software tools, storing the software environment, and increasing the use of science gateways and web services that track and preserve the conditions of computational research. "Our strategy is to keep pushing those technologies forward and expose our users to the best practices for enhancing computational reproducibility," says Dan Stanzione, TACC's executive director.

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Check Out TACC's New Magazine, Texascale
 

Check Out TACC's New Magazine, Texascale

Have you read TACC's Texascale magazine? We'd love to hear what you think. Drop us a line with comments at: communications@tacc.utexas.edu. Also, if you'd like to be added to our mailing list, please send us your physical address.

DIGITAL MAGAZINE

 
 
     
 
 
  TACC Wants to Hear from You!

TACC Wants to Hear from You!

TACC supports researchers, educators, and students across the country. What has TACC helped you achieve? TACC would love to hear about your successes so we can highlight your work in reports, publications, and on social media.

Send your story ideas: communications@tacc.utexas.edu

  Welcome Steve Black to TACC's Cloud and Interactive Computing Group!

Welcome Steve Black to TACC's Cloud and Interactive Computing Group!

Steve Black joins TACC's Cloud and Interactive Computing group in the Advanced Computing Interfaces area as an engineering scientist. Steve worked for many years as a software engineer at Lockheed Martin Space Systems, IBM, Sun Microsystems, and Oracle, and as a physicist with the Naval Research Laboratory conducting research on underwater sound transducers. We're excited to have him join the TACC team!

  Work at TACC!

Work @ TACC

Working at TACC means being part of a dynamic and exciting environment, where talented individuals pursue their interests, engage their imaginations, and work at the forefront of computational research. Working with us also means living in Austin, an exceptional city that thrives on innovation, culture, and creativity.

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