September 2018

 

About TACC   |   Contact

 
 
  New Texas Supercomputer to Push the Frontiers of Science  
 

New Texas Supercomputer to Push the Frontiers of Science

The National Science Foundation announced that it has awarded $60 million to TACC for the acquisition and deployment of a new supercomputer that will be the fastest at any U.S. university and among the most powerful in the world. The new system, known as Frontera (Spanish for "frontier"), will begin operations in 2019. Frontera will allow the nation's academic researchers to make important discoveries in all fields of science from astrophysics to zoology, and it further establishes The University of Texas at Austin's leadership in advanced computing.

LEARN MORE

 
 
     
 
 
  Preventing Natural Hazards from Becoming Societal Disasters  

Preventing Natural Hazards from Becoming Societal Disasters

Through the NSF-funded DesignSafe project, TACC has been collecting real-time data for Hurricane Florence. The project provides investigators with the equipment, software, and support services needed to collect, process, and analyze perishable data from natural hazard events. Researchers have access to state-of-the-art data collection equipment including computing, unmanned aerial systems, data visualization, and backpacks with natural hazards reconnaissance essentials. To facilitate field data collection and data transfer to DesignSafe, the program uses a custom mobile application. DesignSafe is a collaboration with the UT Cockrell School of Engineering and part of the Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure (NHERI), the next generation of NSF support for a natural hazards engineering research large facility.

LEARN MORE

 
 
     
 
 
  Stampede2 Helps Show New Target in HIV-1 Replication

The naturally-occurring compound IP6 (red) facilitates the formation and assembly of HIV-1 structural proteins, results from Stampede2 show. [Credit: Juan R. Perilla, University of Delaware]

 

Stampede2 Helps Show New Target in HIV-1 Replication

The Stampede2 supercomputer at TACC helped model a key building block in the HIV-1 protective capsid. The findings, reported in the journal Nature, could lead to strategies for therapeutic intervention in HIV-1 replication. "I think Stampede2 is a great machine, and it's extremely beneficial to the scientific community to have a resource like that available on a merit-based system," said study co-author Juan Perilla, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware.

LEARN MORE

 
 
     
 
 
 
Preparing for Chemical Attacks with Improved Computer Models

Plume development in time. [Credit: Suddher BhimiReddy and Kiran Bhaganagar]

 

Preparing for Chemical Attacks with Improved Computer Models

Researchers ran simulations on Stampede2 that predicted the spread of deadly plumes from chemical weapons in work supported by the University of Texas Research Cyberinfrastructure initiative. Kiran Bhaganagar, professor of mechanical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio, and her team from Laboratory of Turbulence Sensing and Intelligence Systems, are using Stampede2 to develop models that could reduce prediction time from hours to just a few minutes.

LEARN MORE

 
 
     
 
 
  Turn on the Switch

The TACC/Sun Microsystems Magnum switch is now a part of CHM's permanent historical collection.

 

Turn on the Switch

A piece of TACC's history is now a part of the Computer History Museum's permanent historical collection, sealing its place as a milestone in computing. TACC's Sun Microsystems Magnum switch was a critical component of high-performance computing in 2008-2012. As part of the Ranger supercomputer, the switch was the largest of its class and is an example of InfiniBand technology. In 2008, Ranger was the first supercomputer in open science to approach the petascale performance mark at 579.4 teraflops. The switch was the heart of TACC's Ranger supercomputer, connecting the tens of thousands of processors together into a blazingly fast high-speed interconnected network.

LEARN MORE

 
 
     
 
 
  Microwave Generation from Silicon Could Make Key Technology Much Cheaper, Better

This figure shows how silicon can host the Gunn Effect (generate microwaves) if it is shaped as nanowire and mechanically strained. The silicon nanowire modifies the energy bands in such a way that the distance between two electron energy bands can be much less than 1 eV. [Credit: Reza Nekovei, Texas A&M University-Kingsville]

 

Microwave Generation from Silicon Could Make Key Technology Much Cheaper, Better

Researchers used Stampede1 to find a way to generate microwaves with inexpensive silicon, a discovery that could dramatically cut costs and improve devices such as sensors in self-driving vehicles. Computer models on Stampede1 showed that if a voltage is applied to stretched silicon nanowires, the emission of microwaves could be induced. The findings were published in the journal Nature Scientific Reports. "Without resources available to us from TACC, we would not have been able to perform the required simulations and validations," said study co-author Reza Nekovei, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Texas A&M University-Kingsville.

LEARN MORE

 
 
     
 
 
  Study Overturns Assumptions about Genome Size, Repeat Sequences

A Burmese python superimposed on an analysis of gene expression that uncovers how the species' organs change after feeding. Credit: Todd Castoe

 

Study Overturns Assumptions about Genome Size, Repeat Sequences

Based mostly on studies of mammals and birds, biologists assumed that the number of repeated sequences and transposable elements in a vertebrate's genome corresponded to the genome's size. But a major new study of snake and lizard genomes that used TACC resources for analysis determined the relationship is not so clear. Writing in Nature Communications, a team from The University of Texas at Arlington showed that lizard and snake genomes possess distinct and often extreme characteristics, and that their genomes and evolution are more unique and variable than other vertebrates.

LEARN MORE

 
 
     
 
 
  Texas Women in HPC Chapter Formed

Texas Women in HPC Chapter Formed

The newly formed Texas Women in HPC (TX-WHPC) chapter is one of the first chapters in the Women in High Performance Computing Pilot Program. TX-WHPC is co-chaired by Melyssa Fratkin, Industrial Programs Director at TACC, and Carolyn Devany, President of Data Vortex Technologies. The group will bring together professional women in industry, academia, and government from the advanced computing community across the state.

LEARN MORE

  Welcome, Jorge Alarcon Ochoa and Ari Martinez!

(Left to right): Jorge Alarcon Ochoa and Ari Martinez

Welcome, Jorge Alarcon Ochoa and Ari Martinez!

Welcome Jorge Alarcon Ochoa and Ari Martinez to TACC! Jorge joins TACC's Life Sciences Computing Group as a data science specialist. His main projects are CyVerse and the DARPA Synergistic Discovery and Design Environment. Jorge has a bachelor's degree in Physics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Ari comes to TACC from Data Direct Networks, where he spent eight years architecting, deploying, and supporting TACC's Lonestar4, Lonestar5, Corral2, Corral3, Stockyard, and Ranch systems. Ari received his degree in Computer Science from The University of Texas at Brownsville.

  Work at TACC!

Work at TACC!

Working at TACC means being part of a dynamic and exciting environment where talented individuals can pursue their interests, engage their imaginations, and work at the forefront of computational research. Working with us also means living in Austin, an exceptional city that thrives on innovation, culture, and creativity.

EXPLORE OPPORTUNITIES AT TACC

 
 
     
 
 
 

 

Contact | Feedback | Jobs

©2011-2017 Texas Advanced Computing Center
10100 Burnet Road, Austin, TX 78758
The University of Texas at Austin

Unsubscribe