January 2018

 

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  AI, Supercomputers Help Alleviate Urban Traffic Problems

Deep learning tool recognizes cars, bicycles and pedestrians and characterize how these objects move and interact.

 
 

AI, Supercomputers Help Alleviate Urban Traffic Problems

Researchers from TACC, UT's Center for Transportation Research, and the City of Austin developed a tool that uses artificial intelligence to improve traffic flow in the city. The tool recognizes objects in raw traffic camera footage and characterizes how objects move and interact. Traffic engineers and officials can use the data to improve the safety and efficiency of the city's transportation network.

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  Bio-Based Compound Offers Greener Carbon Fiber Alternative

Pictured from left to right are Adam Bratis, Violeta Sànchez i Nogué, Todd Eaton, Gregg Beckham, Vassili Vorotnikov, and Eric Karp, part of the NREL team working on a cost-competitive, sustainable process for creating acrylonitrile and carbon fibers from renewable biomass.

 

Bio-Based Compound Offers Greener Carbon Fiber Alternative

Gregg Beckham, a group leader at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and a multidisciplinary team used TACC's Stampede1 and Stampede2 supercomputers to develop a new process to convert waste plant materials to green carbon fibers, which can then be used to make vehicles such as cars, airplanes and space shuttles lighter. The bio-based process can help lower fuel use and lessen the environmental footprint of transportation and industry.

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  Tailoring Cancer Treatments to Individual Patients

Model of tumor growth in a rat brain before radiation treatment (left) and after one session of radiotherapy (right). Credit: Lima, Oden, Hormuth, Yankeelov and Almeida]

 

Tailoring Cancer Treatments to Individual Patients

The Center for Computational Oncology at UT Austin has developed computer models and patient-specific analytic tools to predict how cancer will progress in a specific individual, based on their tissue, cellular and subcellular protein signaling responses. Using the advanced computing resources at TACC, they showed that they can predict how brain tumors will grow with much greater accuracy than previous models.

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  Designing a Golden Nanopill

Geometric features of gold-coated liposomes based on random and uniform arrangements of gold nanoparticles on the core surface. Credit: Jaona Randrianalisoa, Xiuying Li, Maud Serre, Zhenpeng Qin.

 

Designing a Golden Nanopill

Researchers from The University of Texas at Dallas and the University of Reims reported the results of investigations into the optical properties of complex plasmonic vesicles: minute capsules that can navigate the bloodstream, and, when hit with a quick pulse of laser light, change shape to release their contents. The researchers used TACC supercomputers to gain insights into how plasmonic nanoparticles can be optimally designed and activated.

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  TACC Helps Organize Workshop on Software Challenges in Supercomputing

SCEC17 Workshop Participants

TACC Helps Organize Workshop on Software Challenges in Supercomputing

In December, TACC collaborated with the Centre for Development in Advanced Computing (CDAC) in India to host the "Software Challenges to Exascale Computing" workshop. The workshop fostered international collaborations in the area of software for the current and next generation supercomputing systems.

  Silky Secrets to Make Bones

Silky Secrets to Make Bones

A recent study found that genes can be activated in human stem cells to initiate biomineralization, a key step in bone formation. Scientists engineered spider web silk combined with silica to activate the cell membrane protein receptor called integrin. TACC's Stampede1 supercomputer aided in the research, which will help efforts to cure diseases such as osteoporosis and calcific aortic valve disease.

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  Welcome, Joshua Urrutia and Collin Weir to TACC!

Joshua Urrutia & Collin Weir

Welcome, Joshua Urrutia and Collin Weir to TACC!

Joshua Urrutia has joined TACC's Life Sciences Computing in the Research Acceleration area. He previously worked at Oregon Health Science University and Reed College and brings his experience in bioinformatics and biology outreach to the team. Collin Weir joins TACC as a systems administrator in the Networking, Security and Operations group. Collin received a degree in Electrical Engineering from Texas State University and was a participant on the SC17 Student Cluster Team.

 
 
     
 
 
 

 

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