Expanding Pathways in Computing (EPIC)

WeTeach_CS
 

Goals and Outcomes

The University of Texas at Austin's WeTeach_CS project trains K-12 educators to improve access to high quality computer science experiences for a broad and diverse range of students. WeTeach_CS is increasing the number of computer science certified high school teachers, increasing the number of high schools offering computer science courses, increasing the number and diversity of students enrolled in computer science courses, and expanding access to computational thinking, coding and programming experiences for all students in K-8.

Measurable Outcomes

The WeTeach_CS Measurable Outcomes was achieved in steps: 1) Increase certified CS teachers, 2) Increase high schools offering CS, 3) Increase high school students enrolled in CS, 4) Broaden diversity for CS course enrollment, 5) Expand CS skillset opportunities in grades K–8.

Over 500 inservice Texas educators have added a computer science certification through the WeTeach_CS Certification Incentive Program since fall 2015. This total exceeds all university pre-service programs in the nation combined.

Source: 2019 TI Leadership Summit, EPIC Presentation (slide #35)

The number of certified computer science teachers, in Texas, with initial certifications in 2011–12 or later, has risen from much less than 100 during the 2011–12 school year to almost 750 during the 2017–18 school year. The most dramatic increase started during the 2014–15 school year.

Texas is closing the gaps for economically disadvantaged students and students of color but still struggling to attract young girls to high school computer science.

Source: 2019 TI Leadership Summit, EPIC Presentation (slide #45)

The number of high schools students, in Texas, that are enrolled in computer science courses, and are categorized as Economically Disadvantaged (Eco-Dis), female, or Under-Represented Minority (URM) has steadily increased from almost 10,000 during the 2011–12 school year to almost 30,000 (Eco-Dis), 25,000 (female), and 15,000 (URM) during the 2017–18 school year.